×
150
Fashion Jobs
SAROJ JALAN
Marketing Strategist
Permanent · KOLKATA
ADD UR CO LLP
Production Manager
Permanent · Chennai
THE GLOBAL ZONE HR SERVICES
Production Manager/ Supervisor/ Incharge
Permanent · Pune
PUMA
Manager - Digital Marketing
Permanent · Bengaluru
THE BANYAN HR CONSULTS
Brand Manager For Leading Women's Wear Garments CO at Coimbatore
Permanent · Coimbatore
LEVI'S
Manager, Retail Merchandising (Ebo)
Permanent · Bengaluru
GLAN MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCY
Senior Buyer Lingerie (Knits Western Wear) - Retail Brand
Permanent · GURUGRAM
JOB INDIA
Asst. Manager E-Com Operations (Garments Retail) Gurgaon
Permanent · Faridabad
VASTRAKALA EXPORTS
Quality Manager
Permanent · CHENNAI
PEOPLE ALLIANCE WORKFORCE PRIVATE LIMITED
Manager / in Charge - Production/Quality/Cutting - Garments Industry
Permanent · Bhiwandi
MINT AND MILK COMMUNICATIONS
Senior Account Executive
Permanent · MUMBAI
PUMA
Manager- Buying (Apparel)
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager- Business Intelligence
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager- Trade Compliance
Permanent · Bengaluru
LEVI'S
Technical Product Manager
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager- Supply Planning
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Senior Manager - Performance Marketing- Marketplac…
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Regional Sales Manager- Mbo (South)
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager- Returns And Spf Operations
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager Merchandising
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Project Manager- Operations
Permanent · Bengaluru
PUMA
Manager- Logistics Operations
Permanent · Bengaluru
By
Reuters
Published
Nov 5, 2021
Reading time
2 minutes
Share
Download
Download the article
Print
Click here to print
Text size
aA+ aA-

Doodlage finds sustainable way to high fashion

By
Reuters
Published
Nov 5, 2021

An Indian designer is using discarded pieces of cloth to piece together fashionwear for men and women as a sustainable alternative to high-end garments.
 

Indian designer finds sustainable way to high fashion


New Delhi-based Kriti Tula's fashion label Doodlage collects fabric waste from factories discarded for minor defects and pieces them together to create flowing dresses and sarees, selling them for about $100 a piece.
 
Tula said the label, which includes a men's line featuring patchwork shirts with denim strips, emerged out of her concern for global warming and the fashion industry's impact on the environment.

Having worked at major textile export houses, the designer said she had seen the environmental cost of high fashion first-hand: waste of cloth and water, and toxins emitted in the production process.
 
"Everything that we wear eventually impacts everything that we eat and consume and we breathe," Tula told Reuters at her workshop in the capital.
 
The roughly $2.4 trillion global fashion industry accounts for 8-10% of the world's carbon emissions - more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined, the United Nations Environment Programme said in 2019.
 
The industry is also the second-biggest consumer of water, generating about 20% of the world's wastewater, it added.
 
Tula said sourcing the scraps initially proved complex and the product prices had to be higher than what many buyers may have felt was worth paying for recycled wear.
 
Gradually though, her business has found like-minded vendors and partners, she said.
 
Besides clothes, her label also makes soft toys, bags, purses and paper out of leftover fabric.

© Thomson Reuters 2022 All rights reserved.